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January Global Health Readings, #2

This is always an interesting annual poll to review, when the Kaiser Family Foundation seeks information about how the public sees global health.  My takeaways from this year:
 – the public remains impressively uninformed about how much we spend on global health (average estimate of 30% of the federal budget)
 – mounting partisan differences on global health intervention efficacy and reach are concerning, if not surprising, particularly as historically this has been one of (very few) bipartisan support in Congress
 – the public views the effectiveness of GH interventions skeptically (which may not be entirely inappropriate)
It’s a quick read, and worth flipping through.
A brief piece discussing palliative care in Kerala, India, and the strides that state has made in increasing access – reminscient of the inpatient hospice now located on the property of the Sivananda Center in Hyderabad.
Interesting piece claiming that meliodosis is more widespread than appreciated. Which may well be true. I find it interesting in part as a reminder that the numbers we bandy about at the Global Burden of Disease level are built on foundations that have marked heterogeneity in quality of data.
Guardian article discussing Women on Web, who provide medical abortions via mail to women in countries where this is illegal. The global intertwining of the process is impressive, with a generic producing company in India playing a key role.
This entry was posted in BMC.
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